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Clients From Hell Podcast

The Clients From Hell podcast is equal parts humorous and helpful as it explores the modern life and times of creative professionals.
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Clients From Hell Podcast
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Sep 5, 2017

There are a lot of freelancing, entrepreneur, and side-hustle expert out there, but few have earned their authority quite like Chris Guillebeau. He joins Bryce to discuss why there's no one-size-fits-all approach to freelancing and his advice for folks who want to get started. 

Chris is the host of Side Hustle School and bestselling author of The $100 Startup, The Happiness of Pursuit, and The Art of Non-Conformity. His new book, Side Hustle: From Idea to Income in 27 Days, is on sale on September 29th, 2017.

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Side Hustle School: https://sidehustleschool.com/

Side Hustle: From Idea to Income in 27 Days: https://www.amazon.com/Side-Hustle-Idea-Income-Days/dp/1524758841

Aug 29, 2017

Convincing a client you can deliver an agency as a sole proprietor is difficult but incredibly valuable.

Laura Elizabeth of Client-Portal.io discusses how she does it, and the tools and techniques other freelancers can use to elevate their authority with clients. 

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Client Portal: https://client-portal.io/ 

Laura's article on onboarding clientshttps://doubleyourfreelancing.com/onboarding/ 

Lauren's Twitter: https://twitter.com/laurium 

Aug 8, 2017

Getting your client to live up to their side of your business relationship can be difficult and it's almost always necessary. But how do you do it? Whether it's the client delivering promised files, paying your rate, or them simply keeping their word, there's rarely an easy fix. 

James Rose of Content Snare has at least one solution – and a lot of quality advice. If you enjoyed what James had to say, he invites you to check out the Content Snare Facebook Group!

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Content Snarehttps://contentsnare.com

Content Snare's Facebook Grouphttps://contentsnare.com/group

James Rose on Twitter: https://twitter.com/_jimmyrose

Aug 1, 2017

The majority of the 10 million jobs created since 2005 have been freelance, temporary, or on-call opportunities. This is the gig economy – and a team at Stanford are developing a platform to source teams of freelancers in mere minutes. 

On today's episode, we discuss Stanford's 'flash organization' software, how it works, and what it means for the future of freelancing. 

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Topic via https://thehustle.co/

Sarah Kessler at The Quartz: https://qz.com/1027606/forget-the-on-demand-worker-stanford-researchers-built-an-entire-on-demand-organization/

Noam Scheiber at The New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/12/business/economy/flash-organizations-labor.html

Taylor Kubota at Stanford News: http://news.stanford.edu/2017/05/10/software-creates-demand-flash-organizations/

 

Jul 25, 2017

Learn how to build a network and effectively market yourself – from someone who hates networking and marketing. 

 

In this episode, Bryce discusses:

- The dumb, terrible, not-so-good way people and businesses try to market themselves

- Why Bryce hates marketing (and how that lead him to becoming a marketing consultant)

- How you can meet and build a network (it's about making a personal connection)

- The simplest way to market your business (know your audience's problem before you try to solve)

- The principles behind good marketing

- The simplest, most effective marketing trick out there (spoiler: it's listening)

Jul 18, 2017

Do you know what it takes to get a good job? Most people look for jobs by shouting into the online abyss – but there's a better way. Freelancers are especially empowered to not only find work but to create it for themselves. 

 

In this episode, Bryce discusses:

- Why nobody knows how to find good work 

- The evolving model for employment and what that means for you

- Don't treat your portfolio as the only path to employment

- How to understand your prospects needs and how you can help (hint: listen to next week's episode)

- Don't wait for an open position; communicate to a prospect you understand their problem and how you can help

Jul 4, 2017
And maybe more importantly, who do your clients think you are? 
 
 
 
Here's the thing. When we talk about "personal brand" (gross), a lot of us forget that we're talking about who you are, and how you communicate that. 
 
 
The good news? That means you can actually be you. 
 
Create content that matters to you, your audience, and your potential clients
 
Do NOT dilute who you are, or try to be who you think your audience wants you to be.
 
According to an Edelman study of 11,000 consumers, 92% of people want to do business with companies that share their values. And values aren't something you put on — they go deep. 
 
Clients want to work with people who share their values too. And think about it — don't you too?
 
Best-selling writer Jeff Goins calls these people his "tribe," while designer and author Paul Jarvis calls them his "rat people." That's not an insult - Paul loves rats, so when he finds the 1% of the population who feel the same way, he knows these are people he wants to connect with. That's incredibly powerful. 
 
Be human.
 
Transparency, openness, honesty, and authenticity are incredibly powerful currencies in the attention economy. They are how you build a relationship with people even if you’ve never met. That, and providing value with your content – but that value isn't always a 1-to-1 transaction.
 
In fact, not everything is transactional. Not everything is how-to. A lot of times, people are happy to share stories and interesting ideas.
 
 
Dan Harmon says "Find your voice, shout it from the rooftops, and keep doing it until the people looking for you find you." And he's right. 
 
 
Care. Be passionate. Give a shit.
 
Author, journalist, and psychology expert Charles Duhigg says one of the best ways to stand out is by indulging in your obsessive compulsive disorder.
 
He says "People who are successful are people who are not ashamed to say, I am super passionate and interested in X and I m going to indulge that. Yes, I'm a weirdo. But I m going to figure this out, and I'll figure out what I like about it, so that I can share it with you."
 
Essentially, what he's saying is "be a big fat dork about whatever tickles you." Ideally, this aligns with your freelancing career.
 
It’s your business – do it your way.
 
There are dozens of tactics and advice columns on the best way to approach your business, your marketing – whatever. It can often be worth your time to listen, but rarely is this advice iron clad.
 
Whether you're trying to find an audience, attract prospects, or just figure your personal business out, don't just assume you need to make x posts a day on every social media channel, or a portfolio that looks like your competition's. 
 
What you really need to do is know who you are. Know what matters to you. Chase what excites you and build from there. Look for like minded people. Reach out. Ask them questions. Listen. Genuinely get to know them. Strive to give more than you take. Leave things better than you found them. 
 
Reflect. Reiterate. Wear your past mistakes proudly and do better in the future.
 
If you simply keep your word and do what you say you'll do, you're head and shoulders above the rest.

Today's links: 

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Do you like the show? 

Or do you hate it? Are you totally lukewarm on it? Let us know what you think (and help us out) by doing a quick survey. We'll love you forever for it. 

> Help us out! Please? Please.

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely.

Jun 27, 2017

A recent survey of freelance workers done by AND CO showed that the pay gap exists even for the self-employed. On average, self-employed women make less than self-employed men. That's troubling information, given that freelancers are able to set their own wages. So what's happening here? What baggage are we bringing in to setting our own rates? 

Joining Bryce to discuss this important and delicate topic is Lauren Loria, a Michigan based commercial photographer that helps clients build their brands through visual imagery that reflects their business' personality.  

Today's links: 

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This episode is sponsored by AND.CO, the freelancer's resource! They offer great tools for freelancers, including curated job lists, time tracking and invoicing software, contracts, free guides and more! 

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely.

Also: do you love the podcast? Is there anything you'd like to see us change about it? Let us know by filling out this short survey!

Jun 20, 2017

Who do you think you are?

Everyone who works for themselves has wrestled some point over what title to use. Many start by using the title "freelance _______"—designer, writer, software developer, or whatever the case may be.

The words you use influence others’ perception of you.'

Today's links: 

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According to Andrew Newberg, M.D. and Mark Robert Waldman, words can literally change your brain. They argue that a single negative word can increase the activity in our amygdala (the fear center of the brain). This releases dozens of stress-producing hormones and neurotransmitters, which in turn interrupts our brains’ functioning. In other words, “angry words send alarm messages through the brain, and they partially shut down the logic-and-reasoning centers located in the frontal lobes."

Meanwhile, a positive word can strengthen areas in frontal lobes and promote cognitive function. They write "as our research has shown, the longer you concentrate on positive words, the more you begin to affect other areas of the brain. Functions in the parietal lobe start to change, which changes your perception of yourself and the people you interact with. A positive view of yourself will bias you toward seeing the good in others, whereas a negative self-image will include you toward suspicion and doubt. Over time the structure of your thalamus will also change in response to your conscious words, thoughts, and feelings, and we believe that the thalamic changes affect the way in which you perceive reality."

So what does that mean for us?

What’s your first thought when you hear the word "freelancer"? Do you picture a college kid working out of her parent’s basement? Most people perceive freelancers as in the lurch, between unemployment and their next ‘real’ job.

Many people who call themselves freelancers don’t exactly think of what they do as a business. But they should.

Clients too often see freelance arrangements as low-cost line items rather than strategic partnerships.

And that creates a power imbalance, with the client in charge—hardly an ideal situation for independent workers, especially those trying to start a business with the express purpose of gaining more freedom over their work.

When he first started out, Tim Dietrich described himself as a "freelance database consultant." But he soon realized that the "freelance" tag said more to clients about the structure of his business (process) than what he could actually do for them (results). Tim now introduces himself with this simple line, "I develop custom apps for businesses." Who would you want to work with more: Someone who tells you how they file their taxes or explains what they can do for your balance sheet?

Your livelihood doesn't depend on your own self-perception, but on how potential clients see you and your work.

Freelancers don't always see themselves as business owners because businesses have quarterly targets, revenue streams, and brand images to preserve. And clients expect that other businesses have systems and processes leading to consistent results. Don’t worry if you’re still working on systems and processes. It’s still okay to call yourself a business—which can in turn push you to build a workflow for yourself, set firmer goals, and increase your margins—just like an actual business.

 

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This episode is sponsored by AND.CO, the freelancer's resource! They offer great tools for freelancers, including curated job lists, time tracking and invoicing software, contracts, free guides and more! 

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely.

Also: do you love the podcast? Is there anything you'd like to see us change about it? Let us know by filling out this short survey!

Jun 13, 2017

If 'creativity' is a factor in your work, these ten rules will help you find success in your career. 

When we say success, we don't exclusively mean more clients, more work, or more freedom. We mean all of the above and more: success as a creative means personal and professional development because you are your business and your craft. 

This episode was heavily inspired by articles from:

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This episode is sponsored by AND.CO, the freelancer's resource! They offer great tools for freelancers, including curated job lists, time tracking and invoicing software, contracts, free guides and more! 

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10 Rules for Succeeding as a Creative Professional

  1. You’re on your own.
  • Blogs, teachers, webinars, courses, and classes can help you, but they’re not going to get things done for you. They’re there to refine your skills, give you ideas, or teach you the rules.
  • In almost every instance, they’re positioned in such a way that they’re giving you permission to get started by offering inspiration and addressing your concerns or fears.
  • In terms of creativity, it’s about you: what’s going on inside you, what’s going on around you, and how you manage the two.
  • Though you don’t necessarily have to follow their advice, you should listen to experts. You should follow them. You should consume content that excites you – but you shouldn’t be afraid to strike out on your own.

 

  1. Clients rarely know what they need.
  • Clients hire you because they don’t know exactly what they’re doing. Some clients may think they do, but that’s not exactly the same thing.
  • Listen to what a client says and take to heart what they recommend. They know their product or vision. It can even be worth attempting their version of things to see how it turns out. But then it’s up to you to add value.
  • “Adding value” is why clients will hire you. Show them something new or unexpected (in a good way) – this is how you communicate that your expertise requires more than a few clever mouse clicks.
  • The best client interaction is where you take a client’s vision and add colour.

 

  1. Different is more important than “better.”
  • Better and different are often treated like synonyms in creative fields.
  • Better means you’re following someone else’s path. This isn’t an inherently bad thing, but it’s how derivative and repetitive trends occur. You’re unlikely to outpace that trailblazer, and as a result, you end up looking like a cheap imitation.
  • However, taking someone else’s path and tweaking it to your style, tastes, or needs – making it “better” in a way that matters to you, either as the audience or the artist – is how you start to succeed. And it’s also how you and your work gets better.
  • Competing on outright skill is like competing on price. It’s a global economy. Someone out there is going to better or cheaper than you.
    • If you do something in a way that’s distinctly yours, you have no competition.
  • Being different is more important than being better.

 

  1. Compete on value, not price.
  • Competing on price in a creative field is a bad idea unless you live somewhere with an exceptionally low cost of living. Instead, focus on delivering value.
  • Value can come in many forms, like better than the competition, a standout style, an offering more tailored to the client’s unique needs – whatever. Clients tend to care most about avoiding risk and saving time and money; your value should speak to these points in some capacity, but don’t stress a perfect one-to-one translation.
  • If you deliver value and you can communicate this to prospects, you should charge more.

 

  1. You need to be challenged.
  • If you’re not pushing your skills or expertise, you’re not improving. You’re probably stagnating.
  • An easy job isn’t a bad job, but it’s the jobs where I had to meet tough deadlines and big challenges that have pushed my career forward in terms of skills, impact, and clients.

 

  1. You are what (and who) you surround yourself with.
  • If you want to be better at what you do, seek out those you think are better than you. From colleagues to clients, always shoot high.
  • Follow your inspirations and consume everything they do.
  • Chase your ‘mentors’ and critically examine what they put out. If you can, reach out.
  • Find your community and create a place within it.

 

  1. Always know why you make your decisions.
  • Whether you’re a writer, a photographer, a designer, or a developer, you need to be able to communicate your work beyond “I like the way it looks.”
  • Being able to explain why you made a creative decision is how you communicate your expertise to a client. Explaining why this design is better than that one is how you establish yourself as an authority.
  • Explaining yourself in terms that matter to your client is huge. Whether it’s a visual vocabulary or a grasp of grammar, explaining the worth of your work is how you get hired, rehired, and referred.

 

  1. Embrace failure.
  • Trying to avoid mistakes is paralyzing. Don’t let the possibility of a mistake prevent you from acting.
  • Don’t try to avoid failure. Aim to recover and learn from it.
  • Whether it’s in creative or business terms, you need to be willing to act, fail, and try again. Looking at your failure, assessing what went wrong, and trying again (and again, and again) is everything.
  • Getting out there to do stuff is everything. If it works, do more of it. If it doesn’t work, change it. Quickly.

 

  1. Less is more.
  • Trying to be everything to everyone is a great way to be nothing to no one.
  • Whatever your creative pursuit, simple is good. Remove clutter and distraction.
  • Whatever your business, a niche is good. Add specificity and purpose. Tell one story and tell it well.

 

  1. You need to do the work.
  • Daydreaming about what you can do is fun, but don’t confuse it with doing the actual work.
  • If you feel crummy about what you’re making, that’s fine. Try a new approach. Fail at something new and exciting. Throw the spaghetti at the wall and see what sticks.
  • If you’re not producing, you’re not a professional – you’re a poser.
  • Likewise, if you spend every day writing, taking photos, or working on your designs, you’re not an aspiring anything. You are what you’re doing.

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely.

Jun 6, 2017

How you position yourself is crucial to your career. Philip Morgan joins Bryce to discuss how freelancers – particular freelance developers – can find success by specializing.

Links from today's show:

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This episode is sponsored by AND.CO, the freelancer's resource! They offer great tools for freelancers, including curated job lists, time tracking and invoicing software, contracts, free guides and more! 

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely.

Jun 2, 2017

Bryce reflects on data from the gig economy, sharing insights into how freelancers are succeeding (and what issues they're struggling to overcome). 

Here are the links he talks about during this episode:

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We want to hear from you!

Give us your feedback on how we can improve the Clients From Hell podcast by using this link: https://cfh.typeform.com/to/gEABz7

Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely.

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Shownotes

Survey makeup:

As vast majority of freelancers AND CO interviewed—95% of them—are what are being call "Slash Workers," or independent workers whose services or skills vary by client and project. About 70% of respondents were from the States

Respondent makeup:

  • Creative/design: 33%
  • Consulting - Professional Services: 21%
  • Writing/Journalism/Content: 17%
  • Tech/Web Design: 15%
  • Other 14%
  • Median income for respondents who reported is in the $25,000 to $49,999 range, which aligns with the average income for single taxpayers in the U.S. per the IRS (2014): $34,940.

General takeaways:

  • Freelancing is a growing choice
  • Freelancers enjoy higher quality of life at the expense of financial security
  • This quality of life manifests in the form of freedom, be it personal autonomy or flexibility
  • The traditional concept of the office is on the way out. Working from home is a substitute, but more and more people are interested in a “digital nomad” lifestyle – or the ability to work from anywhere.

Interesting insights:

  • 40% of U.S. workers will be freelance by 2020 (Freelancers Union)
  • Two-thirds of freelancers have 0-3 years of freelancing experience.
  • Going independent is a conscious choice for 94% of freelancers (it’s not a fallback)
  • 41% want to freelance “forever”
  • 95% of freelancers offer two or more services
    • Only 5% offer a single skill or work function
  • Most freelancers chose freelancing for personal growth (only 7% did it for the financial upside)
  • A quarter of freelancers self-describe as nomads (and they’re 11% happier than other freelancers)
    • 60% of freelancers said they’d be interested in pursuing a nomadic lifestyle in the future.
  • Nearly half of freelancers want companies to offer more remote work opportunities
  • About 3/4 of freelancers feel less financially stable since going freelance
    • But 68% say their general quality of life has increased
  • Only 6% of respondents are freelancing until they find their next full-time gig.

Money and jobs:

  • 91% of respondents said they typically get work from word of mouth and referrals
    • Just under half said organic website or portfolio traffic
    • 37% find work through outreach or pitching
    • One-third find work via freelance-specific job boards
    • 23% find work via general job boards
  • 43% earn less than $25K a year
    • 1/6th earn between that and 50k
    • 1/6th earn between 50k and 75k
    • 7% earn between 75k and 100k
    • 10% earn 100k or more
      • Interestingly, there’s a correlation between the experience levels of respondents and their income bracket. Do keep in mind that correlation does not equal causation though

Bonsai found that for all skills and locations, the most significant jump in compensation per experience level comes between the 1-3 and 3-5 year categories. This can be most often attributed to them developing essential business skills (project management, negotiation...), developing their knowledge about their market and their clients, building a strong portfolio and leveraging their network.

Developers earn about 30% more than designers across experience levels and geographies. This happens to be true even for highest charging designers (ie Product Designers) when compared to lowest charging developers (Front-end / Android)

Design rates (in particular graphic design) hardly reach $60 per hour for all locations and experience levels. While developers can see their rates increase quickly with their gaining experience (typically after 3 years), most experienced designers grow rates at a slower pace. The most common explanation we’ve heard for this is local or international competition at lower rates, including from part time designers. The lower barrier to entry for design types, plus the smaller project sizes, leads to lower rates.

The issues for freelancers:

  • 61% say they miss the feeling of community a traditional workplace offered
  • 60% of respondents say there’s a lack of respect for freelancers
  • 44% have been stiffed by a client
  • Men are 4.5x more likely to earn $150k+/year than women
    • And 48% of women fall into the lowest tax bracket
  • 41% of respondents want more protections for freelancer rights
May 23, 2017

 

Sales are a fact of freelancing. We know, it's a bummer. The freedom you get from freelancing comes with the price of reaching out and trying to sell yourself and your services — but that doesn't have to be a bad thing! 

This week's guest, Dan Englander, makes sales his career at Sales Schema, and he knows a thing or two about how to generate leads for your business. He talks about what you need to know about how to promote your services, and how you can play to your strengths as a freelancer. 

Links from today's show:

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This episode is sponsored by AND.CO, the freelancer's resource! They offer great tools for freelancers, including curated job lists, time tracking and invoicing software, contracts, free guides and more! 

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely.

May 16, 2017

 

Setting out on a career as an independent freelancer or entrepreneur is exciting, but also TERRIFYING. How do you know when it's the right time to take the plunge?

John Nastor runs the podcast Hack The Entrepreneur, and has hundreds of hours looking into what makes a happy, healthy, and wealthy solopreneur. He joins Bryce to talk the difference between freelancing and entrepreneurship, how to strike the right balance in life and work, and how to know when you're ready to forge your own path,  

Links from today's show:

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This episode is sponsored by AND.CO, the freelancer's resource! They offer great tools for freelancers, including curated job lists, time tracking and invoicing software, contracts, free guides and more! 

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely.

May 9, 2017

Honing your craft is the journey of a lifetime. It's hard enough to dedicate yourself to your discipline, but when you have to make a living doing it? Then it's even harder. 

Jerzy Drozd is a cartoonist who's made a career of making comics and teaching, well, how to make comics. He's also a warm, wonderful, and insightful fellow with a lot of great ideas, who's pursued his art through all sorts of ups and downs. He joins Bryce to talk about how to hone your focus and make a career out of doing what you love.

 

Links from today's show:

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This episode is sponsored by AND.CO, the freelancer's resource! They offer great tools for freelancers, including curated job lists, time tracking and invoicing software, contracts, free guides and more! 

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely.

May 2, 2017

If you're a freelancer, like it or hate it (and most of us hate it) you're in sales. And for those of us with creative backgrounds, a lot of the time there's a real anxiety about "selling out."

Today's guest Brent Weaver makes a career of helping people with their sales strategies at uGurus. He chats with Bryce about how to get over this fear, and how to make the most money from doing your craft! 

Links from today's show:

http://bit.ly/2u6IctB

http://ugurus.com/

https://twitter.com/brentweaver

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This episode is sponsored by AND.CO, the freelancer's resource! They offer great tools for freelancers, including curated job lists, time tracking and invoicing software, contracts, free guides and more! 

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely.

Apr 25, 2017

 

Life is short. How do you do all the things you want to do in the time you have?

Of all the people Bryce knows, Ryan Estrada probably comes closest to doing it all. Cartoonist, artist, traveler, podcast producer, and all around asskicker, Ryan uses freelancing to make sure he's doing what he loves all around the world.

Links from today's show:

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This episode is sponsored by AND.CO, the freelancer's resource! They offer great tools for freelancers, including curated job lists, time tracking and invoicing software, contracts, free guides and more! 

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on iTunes or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely.

Apr 19, 2017

The best business relationships are built on the same the foundations as romantic ones: clear communication, trust, a mutual sense of value, hugs... So why are most of us afraid of working with our spouse? 

In today's show, Bryce talks to Marie Poulin and Ben Borowski, who live together, laugh together, love together and, yes, work together. Find out how they run a business that fits their lives while working remotely! 

Links from today's show:

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This episode is sponsored by AND.CO, the freelancer's resource! They offer great tools for freelancers, including curated job lists, time tracking and invoicing software, contracts, free guides and more! 

 

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on iTunes or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely. 

Apr 13, 2017

One of the fringe benefits of freelancing? Living the kind of life that makes newspapers write angry op-eds about millennials. Doing what you like when you like, conducting business meetings over Steam chat, doing kick flips over badical guitar riffs. That kind of thing.

To the casual observer, Mark Junker is just that kind of freelancer. An art director and music producer, Junker's makes fun designs for The Yetee, composes soundtracks for Cloudrise Pictures, and just put out a new album, VELTAHL under his alias, R23X. Today he joins Bryce to talk about why your friends are you best resource, why art school is a scam, and how to do the work you love. 

Links from today's show:

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This episode is sponsored by our new book, Hell to Pay 2: A freelancer's guide to making good money (https://clientsfromhell.net/helltopay). 

Podcast listeners save 40% with coupon code: CFHPodcast

https://clientsfromhell.net/helltopay

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on iTunes or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely. 

Apr 11, 2017

Going directly from school to freelancing can be tough, but one illustrator managed to do it. 

Jen Fryer joins Bryce to discuss how she locked a nationally syndicated newspaper as a client, the mistakes first-time freelancers need to make, and what creative professionals need to know to succeed in their craft as professionals. 

Links from today's show:

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This episode is sponsored by our new book, Hell to Pay 2: A freelancer's guide to making good money (https://clientsfromhell.net/helltopay). 

Podcast listeners save 40% with coupon code: CFHPodcast

https://clientsfromhell.net/helltopay

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on iTunes or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely. 

Apr 4, 2017

Freelancers can do more than work remotely; they can live their life on their terms while making a pretty penny. 

Long-time friend of the show Jake Jorgovan helps agencies and consultants win their dream clients. He also travels the world while doing it. 

Links from today's show:

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This episode is sponsored by our new book, Hell to Pay 2: A freelancer's guide to making good money (https://clientsfromhell.net/helltopay). 

Podcast listeners save 40% with coupon code: CFHPodcast

https://clientsfromhell.net/helltopay

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Want to support the show?

Leave us a review on iTunes or recommend us to a friend. It helps immensely. 

Mar 28, 2017

Freelance designer Dylan Smith joins the show to discuss why his business degree helps him as a designer, why finding your community is so valuable, and why Leonardo is his favourite Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle.

Dylan's also organizing the Solo Conference for Freelancers (solo-conf.com) in September!

Want to support the show? Leave us a review on iTunes!

Links from today's show include:

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This week's episode is sponsored by the new edition of Hell to Pay: A freelancer's guide to making good money. (clientsfromhell.net/helltopay)

Bryce's popular guide to freelance finances has a brand new edition out, featuring...

  • An expanded tax section with step-by-step instructions for filing your freelance taxes
  • More money-making advice
  • New tactics for negotiating a higher rate

As always, Hell to Pay teaches you:

  • How to determine your rate
  • How to charge your clients
  • How to earn better money with less work

Buy now and get the new edition when it launches in April!

Podcast listeners save 40% with coupon code: CFHPodcast

> Let's make good money!
clientsfromhell.net/helltopay

Already bought a copy? No problem: you get the new edition for free – expect an email regarding that soon. 

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Questions? Episode ideas?

Talk to Clients From Hell or Bryce Bladon on Twitter. Or shoot us an email

Clients From Hell is on iTunes and Soundcloud
Subscribe to us on iTunes and Android and RSS

Mar 23, 2017

Transitioning from full-time radio jobs to becoming a freelance video and audio producer: Steve Folland of the Being Freelance podcast joins Bryce to discuss his freelance journey. 

Find Steve on YouTube, Twitter, and Instagram

Do you have a question of your own? Shoot us an email

Want to support the show? Leave us a review on iTunes!

--

This week's episode is sponsored by the new edition of Hell to Pay: A freelancer's guide to making good money. 

Bryce's popular guide to freelance finances has a brand new edition out, featuring...

  • An expanded tax section with step-by-step instructions for filing your freelance taxes
  • More money-making advice
  • New tactics for negotiating a higher rate

As always, Hell to Pay teaches you:

  • How to determine your rate
  • How to charge your clients
  • How to earn better money with less work

Buy now and get the new edition when it launches in late March! 

Podcast listeners save 40% with coupon code: CFHPodcast

> Let's make good money!

clientsfromhell.net/helltopay

Already bought a copy? No problem: you get the new edition for free – expect an email regarding that soon. 

--

Questions? Episode ideas?

Talk to Clients From Hell or Bryce Bladon on Twitter. Or shoot us an email

Clients From Hell on iTunes | Soundcloud
Subscribe on iTunes | Android | RSS

Mar 21, 2017

Defining success, setting expectations, and avoiding clients from hell. Chris Hawkins of the 100K Freelancer Podcast joins Bryce to discuss all these things and more. 

S'a good one this week, guys. 

Do you have a question of your own? Shoot us an email

Want to support the show? Leave us a review on iTunes!

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Questions? Episode ideas?

Talk to Clients From Hell or Bryce Bladon on Twitter. Or shoot us an email

Clients From Hell on iTunes | Soundcloud
Subscribe on iTunes | Android | RSS

Feb 27, 2017

Learn how to put your best foot forward when you decide to start freelancing. This is easily our most common Freelance FAQ. 

Do you have a question of your own? Shoot us an email

Want to support the show? Leave us a review on iTunes!

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Freelance FAQ: How do I start freelancing?

KAI

The basic answer is ‘find someone who wants to pay you money for a service you provide, then provide that service.

The longer answer is:

  • Identify a target market you want to work with (The Positioning Manual by Philip Morgan is a great resource for this)
  • Identify an expensive problem -- “We aren’t getting enough leads!” -- that the target market is experiencing
  • Create a service offering that helps the client resolve the problem (“We aren’t getting enough leads”) and moves them towards their dream outcome (“We’re getting too many leads!”)

I started by picking a hobby-skill I had (wordpress development) and finding people who needed WordPress websites. Over time, I identified more valuable problems to focus on and updated my positioning, my target market, my expensive problem, and my service offerings.

But to start, create those ‘rolodex moments’ -- have a strong positioning statement (“I’m a THING who helps TARGET MARKET with EXPENSIVE PROBLEM”) and see what referrals and reaction you get.

BRYCE

What you need to start freelancing

All you really need to freelance is:

  • A Good Mentality (e.g. self-confidence, a willingness to try, etc.)
  • Action (e.g. self-discipline, actually doing the work).
  • A skill that can provide value
  • A plan (e.g. self-reflection, meaningful goals, etc.)

Selling and positioning your skill so that it appeals to clients -- and building a plan around that -- is the real secret to freelancing successfully. Typically, this is referred to as finding a niche, which is something a freelancer should do as soon as possible.

A niche reduces competition and increases specialization. Niche experts can earn more and they’re more attractive to clients with problems their niche experience helps solve. It provides direction and focus.

You’ll want to find some sort of niche ASAP. Here are a few questions to ask yourself to help:

  • What industry do you actually use products from or enjoy?
  • What industry hires freelancers with skills like yours?
  • What industry would you enjoy networking in and actually being a part of?

Finding those first three good clients is the first barrier to overcome.

With those first clients (and future clients), you’ll want to:

  1. Find a client’s problem and know how to solve it.
  2. Target the correct market
  3. Pitch the client by...
  • Address the problem: The client’s issue, objective, needs, goals, etc.
  • Offer a solution: Your strategy, plan, or unique positioning that makes you the answer they’ve been looking for.
  • Fees and timelines: I wouldn’t go too far into this initially, but you’ll want to lay the groundwork for fees and realistic timelines. A client shouldn’t feel blindsided by this stuff down the line.

After those first few client interactions, you should reassess your plan before moving forward. Is your skill offering value to clients? Did you enjoy working with these clients? Are there areas to improve?

If those first few client interactions went well and you want to do more work with them, pursue referrals, build case studies, and focus on refining your service as much as possible.

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Questions? Episode ideas?

Talk to Clients From Hell or Bryce Bladon on Twitter. Or shoot us an email

Clients From Hell on iTunes | Soundcloud
Subscribe on iTunes | Android | RS

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